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10 Reasons Why You Shouldn’t Ignore Testicular Pain

Discussion in 'Reproductive and Sexual Medicine' started by Egyptian Doctor, Aug 20, 2012.

  1. Egyptian Doctor

    Egyptian Doctor Moderator Verified Doctor

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    For most men, pain down below becomes a cause for worry. And with good reason! It could be a cyst or even varicose veins, and no matter how much you’d like to ignore the pain, it is always best you get it checked by a doctor. So don’t think that the pain will go away in a few days because you hate the doctor’s clinic. Instead, find out why you should be rushing to make an appointment.

    Most men don’t pay too much attention to testicular pain. But the truth is, if you cannot think of a bad fall where your testicles got hurt, chances are you might have one of these 10 medical problems. You don’t want to take the risk, when some conditions might require surgery to remove your testicles. And all this because you ignored the pain in the first place. So sit up, take notice, and then take valid action to find out what is causing testicular pain.

    1. Inguinal Hernia
    Now hernias are common. And they occur in different body parts, when the fat tissues or pieces of intestines manage to squeeze out of their covering. But did you know that indirect inguinal hernia could be the cause for your testicular pain, ending in your scrotum and causing pain. A doctor can diagnose your problem with just a regular checkup and then recommend mediciation to ease the pain.

    2. Testicular Torsion
    If your sperm cord gets twisted due to external force, blood flow to the testicles is shut off, causing testicular torsion. This is not a pain that will be dull and easily ignored, so if you feel acute pain, seek treatment immediately. Sadly, surgery is the only treatment, and sometimes the doctors will be able to save your testicle by re-setting it and stitching up the inside of the scrotum.

    3. Testicular Cancer
    According to James Buchanan Brady Urology Institute, only one out of every 10 men who have testicular cancer feel any pain in their testicles. But if you feel a little lump in your testicles, it is worth getting tested just to rule out the possibility. It doesn’t have to be painful, but if the lump causes any kind of discomfort make an appointment with your doctor right away. This is especially important if you feel other symptoms as well – pain in the abdomen or lower back, tenderness in the chest and a fluid buildup in your scrotum. Trust us — when it comes to testicular cancer, the earlier it gets detected the better.

    4. Hematocele
    Suffered a blow to the testicles? It always hurts, but usually the pain subsides over time. However, there can be a chance that you suffer from hematocele in the process – a condition where blood collects around the protective sacs in your testicles. The doctor may advice complete rest, or may even have to drain the blood.

    5. Varicocele
    You need to get a quick appointment with your doctor if you can feel a loose mass in your testicles while standing up, that seems to cause no discomfort when sitting down. Remember, varicose veins are a knotted mass of veins that causes pain in the legs. But varicoceles had another form – an enlargement of veins in your testicles that makes you feel like your testicles are full of spaghetti. The veins carrying oxygen have failed, and blood builds up in your testicles which can cause pain. As the varicocles grow, you will find them easier to identify. Mostly, this occurs on the left testicles, because this testicle has a majority of veins. Fortunately, there is no cause for serious concern as this condition is easily treated with medication, but you really do need to see the doctor for quick diagnosis.

    6. Epididymitis
    All men have an epididymis, which is a tube that stays coiled behind the testicle. It is used for delivering as well as storing sperm. But sometimes, it can become inflamed due to bacterial infections and will be the cause for your testicular pain. This is called epididymitis and is characterised by swollen and red testicles. You will notice an acute pain in your testicles especially when ejaculating or passing urine, along with a frequent need to urinate. Thankfully, since the cause is bacterial infection, it can easily be cured with antibiotics. But if you wait too long before you see the doctor, you might need surgery to remove a part of the epididymis that is inflamed.

    7. Spermatocele
    Now your epididymis can cause you more pain than what you might have believed. If it isn’t bacterial infection, it could well be a cyst in your epididymis that is causing the pain. This is called spermatocele and usually these are benign cysts that don’t cause much trouble. Only in extreme cases, where the spermatocele will be the cause for extreme pain, will the doctor suggest removal.

    8. Orchitis
    If you thought that the link between your epididymis and testicular pain has ended, here’s some bad news. There is yet another condition called Orchitis that affects the epididymis, when the swelling is caused by STDs or viral infections like mumps and brucellosis. You will also notice blood in the semen, fever and acute pain when the penis or testicles are touched. Rush to a doctor if you see any of these symptoms. This is because while Orchitis caused by viral infections and STDs can be easily treated with antibiotics and anti-inflammatory medication, orchitis caused by mumps is not treatable.

    9. Kidney Stone
    We have harped in the point that no testicular pain should be ignored; and now we will give you solid proof of that. Sometimes, pain in your testicles can reveal other underlying health problems like kidney stones. A kidney stone will project pain in the downward direction, which means you will feel pain in your testicles. There is no reason to be gravely concerned; often enough the doctor will simply give you pain medication so that you can pass the stone out naturally while urination.

    10. Testicular Rupture
    A rupture in the protective membrane surrounding the testicles can be the cause that blood is leaking in to the scrotum. The rupture can be caused by any injury of external blow to the scrotum. There is just a small window of 72 hours for your rupture to be treated surgically. And if you make it to your doctor in time, four times out of five the doctor will be able to save your testicle.

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    Last edited: Aug 20, 2012

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