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DDx

Discussion in 'Spot Diagnosis' started by J.P.C. Peper, Aug 31, 2012.

  1. J.P.C. Peper

    J.P.C. Peper Bronze Member

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    What's your diagnosis?

    Also, the patient has no (palpable) pulse.

    I'll post the correct answer in a few days!

    DDx.jpg
     

    Add Reply

  2. enrybony

    enrybony Well-Known Member

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    aortic aneurysm
     


  3. sundarto

    sundarto Bronze Member

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    aortic aneurysm for sure
     


  4. Gospodin Seki

    Gospodin Seki Moderator Staff Member

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    Aortic aneurysm
     


  5. bb100

    bb100 Bronze Member

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    fusiform aneurysm of the descending thoracic aorta
     


  6. Emergency medicine Mike

    Emergency medicine Mike Bronze Member

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    Thoracal descendent aortic aneurysm.
     


  7. J.P.C. Peper

    J.P.C. Peper Bronze Member

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    Correct answer:

    Takayasu's ateritis.

    Rare outside of Japan, this systemic vasculitis affects the aorta and its major branches, causing stenosis and thrombosis (lower arrows). Acute inflammation causes dilatation and aneurysms (upper arrows). Affected arteries in the eyes and brain are not uncommon. Due to stenosis in the main branches of the aorta, including the left common carotid artery, the brachiocephalic artery, and the left subclavian artery, Takayasu's arteritis can present with pulseless upper extremities, which is why it is also commonly referred to as the "pulseless disease."
     


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