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5 habits that hurt your back

Discussion in 'Orthopedics' started by Egyptian Doctor, Jan 20, 2012.

  1. Egyptian Doctor

    Egyptian Doctor Moderator Verified Doctor

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    1. You’re Chained to Your Desk

    Fix It: Sitting at a 135-degree angle can reduce compression of the discs in the spine, so lean back slightly every now and then. Do it when you take a phone call or a coworker stops by to chat, Sinett recommends. Make sure your office chair supports the curve of your spine, he says: Your lower back should be supported, and your head should be straight—not lurching forward—when you look at your computer screen. Get up and walk around for a couple of minutes every half hour—take trips to get water, use the bathroom, or grab papers off the printer.

    2. You Have a Long Commute

    Fix it: "Be sure you sit at a 90-degree angle, close to the wheel so you don't have to stretch," he says. "Extending your leg puts your back in a compromised position, but many people don't even realize they're doing it."

    3. You’ve Been Ditching the Gym

    Fix it: In fact, most sufferers would benefit from more exercise—particularly frequent walks, which ease stiffness, says spine surgeon Dr. Raj Rao. For instant relief, he recommends stretching your hamstrings and hips. Moves like these will take some strain off your back.

    4. You Don’t Do Yoga

    Fix it: You can find yoga classes everywhere—at gyms, YMCAs, and local studios. Make sure to tell the instructor about your pain so she can help modify certain moves for you. Or check out our yoga videos on prevention.com to mix and match your own soothing workout.

    5. You’re Addicted to Crunches

    Fix it: You don’t have to ditch crunches entirely, but you should do them slowly and use proper form. Include them as part of a broader core workout that also strengthens your transverse abdominus. This muscle is particularly important for a strong, steady core that supports your back, and the best way to strengthen it is with (noncrunch!) exercises like these. Added bonus: You’ll whittle your middle and beat hard-to-torch belly fat while improving posture and relieving back pain.

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    Last edited: Jan 20, 2012

  2. Neelesh A Dharmadhikari

    Neelesh A Dharmadhikari Famous Member

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