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A Diet to Boost Your Mood & Energy Level

Discussion in 'Dietetics' started by waleed, Dec 2, 2011.

  1. waleed

    waleed Moderator

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    Can Food Boost Energy and Mood?

    It's an intriguing possibility. While it's too soon to say, "an apple a day keeps the doldrums away," researchers are studying the links between what we eat and how we feel. There is evidence that changing your diet can alter your metabolism and brain chemistry, ultimately affecting your energy level and mood.

    Getting Started

    Foods can boost energy in three ways: by providing sufficient calories, by delivering stimulants like caffeine, and by pushing the metabolism to burn fuel more efficiently. As for mood, the best foods are those that stabilize blood sugar and trigger feel-good brain chemicals, such as serotonin. Keep clicking to learn which foods and drinks can do the job.

    Smart Carbs

    Carbs may be the foe of fad diets, but they're vital for boosting energy and mood. They are the body's preferred source of fuel, plus they raise serotonin levels. The key is to avoid sweets, which cause blood sugar to spike and plummet, leading to fatigue and moodiness. Instead, turn to whole grains like whole-wheat bread, brown rice, and cereal. The body absorbs whole grains more slowly, keeping blood sugar and energy levels stable.

    Cashews, Almonds, and Hazelnuts

    These nuts are not only rich in protein, but they also contain magnesium, a mineral that plays a vital role in converting sugar into energy. Research suggests magnesium deficiency can drain your energy. Magnesium is also found in whole grains, particularly bran cereals, and in some types of fish, including halibut.

    Brazil Nuts

    Add Brazil nuts to the mix for a helpful dose of selenium, which may be a natural mood booster. Studies have reported a link between low selenium and poorer moods. This mineral also occurs in smaller amounts in meats, seafood, beans, and whole grains.

    Lean Meats

    Lean pork, lean beef, skinless chicken, and turkey are healthy sources of protein, including the amino acid tyrosine. Tyrosine boosts levels of dopamine and norepinephrine, brain chemicals that can help you feel more alert and focused. Meats also contain vitamin B-12, which may combat insomnia and depression.

    Salmon

    Fatty fish, such as salmon, is rich in omega-3 fatty acids. Studies suggest this substance may protect against depression. While the extent of the link is uncertain, omega-3 fatty acids offer a wide range of other benefits, including heart health. Besides fish, sources of omega-3 include nuts and leafy, dark green vegetables.

    Leafy Greens

    Another nutrient that may reduce the risk of depression is folate. Like omega-3 fatty acids, folate is found in leafy green vegetables, including spinach and romaine lettuce. Legumes, nuts, and citrus fruits are also good sources of folate.

    Fiber

    Fiber is an energy stabilizer. It slows digestion, providing a more steady supply of energy throughout the day. Boost your fiber intake by eating beans, whole fruits, vegetables, whole-grain breads, and whole-grain cereals.

    Water

    Dehydration and fatigue go hand-in-hand. Some studies suggest even mild dehydration can slow the metabolism and sap your energy. The solution is simple -- drink plenty of water or other unsweetened beverages at regular intervals.

    Fresh Produce

    Another way to stay hydrated and energized is to eat fluid-filled foods, such as fresh fruits and vegetables. Skip dry packaged snacks like pretzels in favor of apple wedges or celery. Other hydrating foods include oatmeal and pasta, which swell up with water when cooked.

    Coffee

    Coffee may be one of the world's most popular pick-me-ups, and evidence suggests it works -- at least in the short-term. Caffeine steps up the body's metabolism, temporarily improving mental focus and energy. Frequent mini-servings will keep you alert and focused longer than a single large dose. Just beware of drinking so much coffee that you can't sleep at night. Lack of sleep is an obvious energy-buster.

    mood.jpg
    Source 1:Medical Inspiration-For doctors and Medical students: A Diet to Boost Your Mood & Energy Level
    Source 2:medicinenet
     

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  2. thomasmite

    thomasmite Well-Known Member

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    Yes it is true that foods change mood and provide energy. Every alive thing needs energy for daily routine working. Foods are the best way to get energy and build strong muscles. What do mean by energy, It mean that all the essential ingredient which are important for healthy living. These are vitamins, minerals, proteins, cholesterol, calcium, etc.
     


  3. miraculous

    miraculous Well-Known Member

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    The first thing that comes to my mind when you say food changes food is when you have eaten that's not nice and cause you a diarrhea that will definitely change your mood. (-:
     

    Last edited: Apr 23, 2012

  4. lykalot

    lykalot Well-Known Member

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    Take the stairs. Like doing push-ups, a quick flight up the stairs in your office building will provide aerobic exercise and help you feel more energetic, Casey says. Exercise not only helps your body function better, it also increases the amount of oxygen in your blood and causes your heart to beat faster, which increases blood flow to your muscles and back to your lungs. Exercise also releases endorphins, hormone-like substances that promote an increased sense of well-being.
     


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