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DDx

Discussion in 'Spot Diagnosis' started by J.P.C. Peper, Aug 17, 2012.

  1. J.P.C. Peper

    J.P.C. Peper Bronze Member

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    What’s your diagnosis?

    It’s not herpes. Also, the patient is 55-years old.

    I’ll post the correct answer in a couple of days!

    DDx.JPG
     

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  2. hebatttt

    hebatttt Active member

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    Grover's disease
     


  3. gizem_A

    gizem_A Famous Member

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    Transient acantholytic dermatosis aka Grover' s disease.
     


  4. Gospodin Seki

    Gospodin Seki Moderator Staff Member

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    Grover's disease
     


  5. J.P.C. Peper

    J.P.C. Peper Bronze Member

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    Correct answer:

    Grover’s disease.

    A skin condition of unknown etiology. The rash forms quite rapidly, especially when sweating (so advise the patient to keep cool). It mainly affects Caukasians above 50 years old. It will resolve spontaneously in 6 to 12 months.
     


  6. neo_star

    neo_star Moderator

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    I would like to add a few differentials

    1) Atypical measles
    2) Coxsackievirus infections
    3) Poison ivy
    4) Superficial pyoderma ( due to - scabies, bed bugs, impetigo, tinea )
    5) etc. ( end of thinking capacity )
    :hhh:

    P.S : The etiology, is largely unclear, but there are some who believe that it may be a cutaneous manifestation of mercury poisoning.

    ref - Paul I Dantzig, MD with the Department of Dermatology at Columbia University School of Medicine, "Age-Related Macular Degeneration and Cutaneous Signs of Mercury Toxicity", Cutaneous and Ocular Toxicology, 24: 3-9, 2005.
     

    Last edited: Jan 14, 2013

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