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DDx

Discussion in 'Spot Diagnosis' started by J.P.C. Peper, Aug 26, 2012.

  1. J.P.C. Peper

    J.P.C. Peper Bronze Member

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    What's your diagnosis?

    The lower is seen during lymph node resection. The patient also noticed decoloration of parts of the legs.

    I'll post the correct answer in a few days!

    DDx.jpg
     

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  2. ethar

    ethar Well-Known Member

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    Onchocerciasis
     

  3. Emergency medicine Mike

    Emergency medicine Mike Bronze Member

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    Parasitic disease by nematode...Onchocerciasis.
     

  4. J.P.C. Peper

    J.P.C. Peper Bronze Member

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    Correct answer:

    Onchocerciasis, also known as river blindness.

    It's a parasitic infection, caused by a nematode (Onchocerca volvulus) which is transmitted by the black fly. As long as the worms are healthy, there are no symptoms. When the microfilariae die, bacteria that live inside the worms (Wolbachia pipientis) cause a major inflammatory reaction. Symptoms include loss of vision (the worms can also migrate in the eye), skin atrophy, dermatitis and depigmentation.

    The black fly lives near rivers, hence river blindness.
     

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